Tag Archives: nintendo

Nintendo at the Movies

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“Nintendo had little to no involvement once the crew was on the road. Without guidance, Chisholm was on his own. “This is how my research went: I would call a friend and go, ‘Can I talk to your 12-year-old son?’ And I get the kid on the phone. I go, ‘What’s a good score on this game?’ And he’d go, ‘Like, 50,000.’ I go, ‘Cool. Thank you,’” says Chisholm, explaining some of the gameplay inaccuracies in the film.”

Read my full feature on Nintendo’s transition to Hollywood at Polygon

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Devil’s Third is the Anti-Nintendo

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“Few will consider Devil’s Third a landmark. It’s a real world anachronism, beginning development in the late 2010s, looking and playing as if it’s from ten years earlier than that, and not coming out until 2015. Storytelling rolls out as if a parody of Itagaki’s style: ninja warriors at the government’s employ, the essence of a spaghetti western, lots of bad guy Russians, and the fantastical involvement of political subtexts such as Guantanamo Bay.”

Read my full feature on The Devil’s Third at Playboy

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Mario Tennis Ultra Smash Shows Nintendo’s Progress

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“Accessibility is often underrated, even under-appreciated. There is a reason the Wii darted into mainstream stardom, blindsiding the insular, closed off corners of the usual game marketplace. Ultra Smash has the same appeal of before, so empty and sparse, yet invigorating to someone unfamiliar with video games in general. Nintendo’s lean offering is one of the few still trying to appease new or newer players. Nintendo still sees a premium in simplicity, even if it could mean ostracizing their dedicated followers. They did it before and they’re trying it again, even if the surprising surge of original Wii adopters have mostly moved on to mobile platforms for their gaming.”

Read my full piece on Mario Tennis Ultra Smash on Playboy

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Yo-Kai Watch (3DS) Review

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“To an extent, Yo-Kai Watch does speak down to a specific level of pre-pubescent immaturity. That’s okay. Lessons are universal. If a Yokai named Snotsolong (with its bouncing nasal debris acting as a weapon) is able to help a child cope, so be it. There are other low grade teachings too. Don’t cross a road when the lights are red or you will be scolded by ghost compatriot Whisper. Again, Yo-Kai Watch can overcome the Asian origins by being practical.”

Read my full review of Yo-Kai Watch at GameSkinny

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Yoshi’s Woolly World is Crafted Serenity

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“Now it’s Yoshi’s turn to be that cleverly beautiful, graced with a visual pluckiness and backing from delicate piano keys. Both games play like gentle lullabies, delightful in their easiness and attractive in their quaintness. They’re seen through child-like vision—how could they not be? Ease of play is nostalgic, catchy stage themes recede into the vintage, and the aesthetic form feels built by physical hands.

“Death” in Woolly World is an adorable oops. The music doesn’t stop—no discordant themes play. Few games reach for such tranquility. Another Yoshi is waiting and a soft fade acts as a cushioned transition. All of those pitfalls are probably stacked with mattresses too.”

Read my full thoughts on Yoshi’s Woolly World at Playboy

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Splatoon (Wii U) Review

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“Yes, Splatoon is at odds with all consumers know, nay expect. That’s very Nintendo. They remain a studio either blissfully unaware of their unorthodox market tactics or completely at ease knowing they have built (and sustained) a voracious, defensive fan base. Splatoon’s pop-up, user-made messages in Inkopolis are bizarrely safeguarding of their chosen corporate monolith. “Our game is better than this one” and “Nintendo is awesome” are their sole projections to the outside world, their whole exterior identity. This community is safe but not personable unless you made them a video game. And you work for Nintendo.”

Read my full review of Splatoon on GameSkinny

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Kirby and the Rainbow Curse (Wii U) Review

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“Kirby is best used in interactive lullabies. The music is splendidly catchy, but hushed. Challenge is not appreciated. In fact, Kirby’s best, the Wii’s Epic Yarn, did not let the puffy critter have lives to be concerned with. He was invincible. When Kirby rolls in, it’s to introduce a free day of adventuring, like a child’s perspective of Saturday mornings – where anything is possible.

Rainbow Curse is more of an interactive scribble. It’s disjointed and coarse. Time is not spent adventuring so much as it is hoping a permanently rolling Kirby follows the colored lines that have been sloppily sketched out on the Game Pad. The control methodology is unnecessarily strenuous, without a positive end. Rainbow Curse is less Kirby and more Nintendo selling their device’s (so far) unseen necessity with limiting functionality.”

Read my full review of Kirby and the Rainbow Curse at GameSkinny

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Captain Toad: Treasure Tracker (Wii U) Review

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“Size does not matter. Nintendo’s release has no pretense of being anything other than a smart, whimsical discount adventure with a bantam twosome. Operation Rescue Toadette and it’s obvious counterpart, Operation Rescue Captain Toad, are bright, cheerful, and even a touch twisted. A bevy of hidden items pull Indiana Jones-ian travelers into the deep recesses of these carefully laid out maps.”

Read my full review of Captain Toad: Treasure Tracker at GameSkinny

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NES Remix Pack (Wii U) Review

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NES Remix barely tweaks the bulky pixel craft which bore these console giants originally. A softening filter is a touch egregious, while shiny, crinkly backgrounds and drop shadows provides a darling puppet show-like display in certain Remix stages. Otherwise, they exist as remembered. Pure, untouched, and modestly beautiful – no HD re-skinning required. While Nintendo’s lauded appreciation for their antiquities may be financially propelled first, their treatment and respect of this material remains unparalleled.”

Read my full review of NES Remix at GameSkinny

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Bayonetta 2 (Wii U) Review

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“The work is an audacious and expensive statement in a period of industry maturation. Bayonetta 2 churns through the uncomfortable, but executes a firm split of self-parody and empowerment. Bayonetta herself is a figure-ful conqueror of masculine evil. Bending and contorting to allow room for a camera to slip into areas oft considered inappropriate, Bayonetta issues a wink and roundhouse to one of many relic-adorned nightmares. Her playfully colored sexuality is partially a figment of her identity. She is also a defender of whole feminism, created with the foreign ideals of physical warrior-hood rather than those hidden within macho guns.”

Read my full review of Bayonetta 2 at Blogcritics

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